Ripe’s Winged Wheel: Latest News

The picture on the left was taken in May 2018. It shows a CTC Winged Wheel plaque on the derelict Lamb Inn in Ripe. The plaque had probably been there for over 100 years. I posted an entry on this blog at the time; we hoped the plaque could be saved although we feared it could finish up in a builders skip. Fortunately, the village stores opposite the pub was on the case.

Now, I should explain that the Ripe Village Stores includes a superb café. It’s a favourite of the tourers; in fact we visited it more times than any other café last year. It’s very cyclist friendly, the food, tea and coffee are great and we often meet other cyclists there as well

Over the past 18 months or so the plaque has been saved, handed over to the village stores and restored (it was in a bit of a sorry state) by someone in the East Sussex CTC. It’s now in pristine condition as you can see from the picture on the right.

The plaque is very heavy, being made from cast iron, but Derek managed to lift it onto a table so that I could take a photo. The next stage is for it to be mounted on the wall outside the café. This won’t be easy given it’s weight and size: about two feet in diameter. The café proprietor has advised us that when it’s installed there will be an opening event on a Sunday at which cycling clubs will be invited. We’ll certainly be there. Watch this space for more news.

Happy cycling,

Clive

Do you want to join the 2020 Committee?

A Record Year for The Tourers

2019 was a record year for the tourers: 137 touring rides covering just over 4500 miles. That’s 17 more than in each of the previous two years and 34 more than in 2016.

Ideally, we should run 150 rides per year; that’s because we try to run three touring rides per week, on Tuesday, Thursday and Sunday. However, we sometimes have to cancel rides due to inclement weather. The fact that we’re cancelling fewer rides these days may, perhaps, have something to do with climate change. So, if we achieve 150 touring rides in a year, it may not necessarily be good news for the planet!

For now, the good news is that we’ve got 2020 off to a good start. Just as we did in 2019, our first ride of the year was to Molly’s Café on the promenade at Rottingdean. The route we take to Molly’s makes for a reasonably easy ride as it’s a round trip of 20 miles, starting and finishing at the Martello Tower in Seaford, and is graded as a 3B.

Our touring rides this year will largely be run in similar fashion to the past couple of years whereby the Tuesday rides will be about 20 to 25 miles, the Thursday rides usually between 40 and 50 miles and those on Sunday will be about 35 miles, give or take a few miles. However, we sometimes do longer rides such as to Littlehampton which is a round trip of 70 miles.

This year the Tuesday rides may have optional extensions to the route, after the café stop, which will be led by Dave Sutton. Dave is training for JOG-LE (John O’Groats to Land’s End) so needs to do the extra mileage. I’ll lead the shorter ride back to the finish.

I’m pleased to say that we have a third touring ride leader: Carol Bryant. Carol recently became a ride leader and is keen to lead some rides this year. In fact, as the numbers on our touring rides increase, we’re finding it useful to have two ride leaders on a ride with one leading and the other acting as Lanterne Rouge.

If you haven’t been on one of our touring rides then why not give us a try. The rides are sociable, always include a café stop and we cycle at a ‘moving’ average speed of about 12½ mph. That’s about the right pace for being able to chat with a fellow cyclist without getting out of breath and also to admire the scenery yet, sufficiently fast to get some decent exercise.

Our next ride will be to Horam on Sunday, a round trip of 31 miles. Details are on the Rides Calendar.

Happy Cycling New Year

Clive Aberdour

Charity Nominations for 2020/2021

 

 

Have you made your nomination yet?

If not, you’ve got just over a week to do so!

All nominations to be made by 30th December 2019

See here for more details and here to see the nominations so far

A Highly Convivial Tourers’ Christmas Meal

A record number of 36 were at the Cycle Seahaven Tourers’ Christmas Meal in the British Legion yesterday evening. It was our fifth year in succession at the Legion and we’ll certainly be returning there for our Christmas meal next year. It’s terrific value for money and the bar and serving staff are amazing: excellent service.

There’s often some entertainment and this year the Seaford Streamers Ukulele Ensemble played as we dined; it all made for a highly convivial evening. It was a great way to round off our record breaking CSH Tourers’ year; there’ll be more about this in a post at the end of the year.

Merry Christmas everyone,

Clive

Have your say on infrastructure deficiencies in our area

South Coast Alliance for Transport and the Environment (SCATE)

SCATE held a very positive meeting with the National Park authority about our Transport Vision and the need to promote more sustainable transport within and to the Park (for the Park’s own sake and for carbon reduction reasons).

SCATE agreed to draw up a network of on road routes that are needed for sustainable transport; primarily for cycling, but can include walking (crossing major roads), bus routes and links to train stations.  This will then be presented to the Park Authority to create an official map and to work with them to achieve changes where they can be made.

So if you know of a missing link that is deterring you, or is very unpleasant or dangerous to use, please let us know about it (you can tell us about as many as you like).  For example, if you live in Lewes you might want to nominate the A273 going out of Lewes through Offham – it’s a fast and busy road and a barrier to people cycling out to Hamsey, or the quiet lanes around Cooksbridge.

Please email Vic Ient on sussexcampaign@gmail.com with your suggestions.  Please name the road and specify the section where you feel something needs to be done.  If possible say what the main issues are and what would make it feel safer and more pleasant to use the route: suggestion! s could include:

  • segregated cycle lanes
  • off-road cycle track
  • lower speed limit
  • green lane implementation (changing the feel of the road to one where walking and cycling are to be expected)
  • better road crossing (could be for people walking as well as cycling)
  • any other suggestions you have 

If you feel a particular location or road should have a bus service (and isn’t currently served) let us know about it and any other infrastructure needed, such as bus stops.  If a place is currently served by bus but poorly and needs improvements, let us know where these are too and what could be improved.

Finally, any trains stations which need better links to the National Park – what deters you or others from using them?

Many! thanks in advance – please share with others who might have suggestions and maybe quiz people who drive too to get a sense of what stops them from leaving their car at home.

Kind Regards

SCATE

A busy day for Cycle Seahaven

Saturday, 20 July 2019 was the busiest day for Cycle Seahaven so far this year.

During the morning we hosted the annual ‘Women’s Festival of Cycling’ Ladies Ride. The club trailer was used to transport the bikes to Heathfield after which the ladies cycled back along the Cuckoo Trail to Seaford, via the Arlington Tea Rooms.

At Peacehaven’s Big Park the Dr Bike mechanics were ready and waiting for whatever the locals had to offer. This was followed by the second ‘members-only’ maintenance workshop, this second one focused on puncture repairs.

At the same time we ran two Ride the Downs rides from Big Park, with four return riders and two new riders. Two of whom joined the club making a total of nine new members in the last week.

Meanwhile, in Friston Forest, the CSH family ride got underway with kids of all ages doing their thing and enjoying the single tracks. 

And if all that wasn’t enough we finished the day with the CSH summer BBQ.  It was great to see so many road riders there! Good food, good beer and great company. 

What an amazing day! Thank you to all the people that helped make it happen.

 

A New Type of Ride: Easy Touring

If you’d like to cycle on one of our touring rides but feel they’re a bit too long and/or a bit too quick then you’re in luck! A new type of touring ride is being launched which may appeal to you.

Called ‘Easy Touring’, these rides will be shorter and slower than our normal touring rides. They will be less than 20 miles, the pace will be an average of 11 mph whilst cycling and the terrain of such rides will be less hilly. As usual a café stop will be included, an essential part of our touring rides.

The first such ride will be next Tuesday, 11th June. The distance will be 18 miles and include a café stop at Upper Dicker. Full details are on the Rides Calendar.

Easy Touring rides will initially be held on an occasional basis but if they prove popular then they will be organised on a weekly basis.

Happy cycling,

Clive Aberdour

Ticks are becoming more prevalent in East Sussex – The risk is severe.

East Sussex is one of the worst areas in Europe for disease-carrying ticks, a new study has revealed.

The report has been compiled by experts from across Europe, including scientists from the University of East London who combed through all recorded incidents of ticks found carrying the bacteria which causes Lyme disease, spanning seven years between 2010 and 2017.

After plotting the data on a map, the south of England appears as one of just a handful of areas in Europe where the risks are severe. The tick which causes the trouble is called ‘Ixodes ricinus’.

Writing in the International Journal of Health Geographics, the study’s authors said: “The distribution of I. ricinus continues to expand northwards in latitude and upwards in altitude in Europe.

“Climate trends and the density of key hosts for the adults of the tick, have been pointed as the main factors behind the spread of I. ricinus.”

The danger zone — covering London, Kent, East Sussex and parts of Essex — is on a par with Northern Italy, Romania, Switzerland and Norway when it comes to ‘very high’ populations of the blood-sucking critters.

Meanwhile, the report also warns climate change is set to increase the number of ticks further.

The data also said areas with a low and gradual rise in spring temperatures, as well as a big rise in spring vegetation, were locations where the blood-suckers thrive.

The authors add: “The highest prevalence occurs in areas of 280°–290° Kelvin (6.85ºC – 16.85ºC) of mean annual temperature – around central Europe and southern parts of Nordic countries – and a slow spring rise of temperature, together with high mean values and a moderate spring rise of vegetation vigor.”

Meanwhile, other maps looked at how predicted increases in temperature caused by climate change could see ticks carrying a certain strain of the bacteria which causes Lyme disease becoming widespread across the UK – and much of the rest of Europe.

The bacteria which the ticks carry, and which in turn causes Lyme disease, is called ‘Borrelia burgdorferi s.l’.

Whether you’re travelling abroad this summer, or you’re simply out and about in one of the UK hotspots identified by this study, you should use a chemical repellent containing DEET (N,N-Diethyl-m-toluamide) to keep the creatures at bay.

You should also wear light-coloured protective clothing that covers the skin, as well as tucking your trousers into your socks.

What’s also vital is that you check your children and pets for any sign of a bite. A typical Lyme rash, spot looks like a bullseye on a dartboard.

And don’t assume that ticks only live in the forests or wild outdoor areas – they could just as easily be lurking in long grass in your garden, just waiting for you to walk past so they can hitch a ride…

 

If you want more information about Lyme Disease and it’s treatment click the NHS link here

If you have a tick the NHS recommend:

  • Use fine-tipped tweezers or a tick-removal tool – you can buy these from some pharmacies, vets and pet shops.
  • Grasp the tick as close to the skin as possible.
  • Slowly pull upwards, taking care not to squeeze or crush the tick. …
  • Clean the bite with antiseptic or soap and water.