The Egrets Way Project

The Egrets Way Annual General Meeting
on Monday 10th June 2019 at 7pm.

At St John Sub Castro, Lewes 

 

A project loved by most if not all of Cycle Seahaven, The Egrets Way now has planning approval in place for the whole riverside route. The majority of final landowner agreements are in place and their next step is to get the substantial funding required to complete construction. Why don’t we show support at their AGM?


Followed by an illustrated talk about the fantastic female founders of the RSPB by Tessa Boase, author of Mrs Pankhurst’s Purple Feather.

“In 1903, an ounce of egret feathers could fetch $32: twice as much as an ounce of gold. To the RSPB, this was a watershed moment.”

The true story of how the snowy egret was pushed to near extinction by the raging Victorian and Edwardian fashion for feathered hats – and how a small group of women fought back to save this, and other species, from ‘murderous millinery’.
An uplifting tale of women and birds. More details on our new website.


 

Eliza Ellie’s fitness campaign attempt two….

Go riding

Get fit

Challenge yourself

Have fun

The spring is officially here and just like a bear waking up from the winter sleep, I am too starting to feel more alive (although coffee helps with that greatly…)

My last year’s plan to get bike fit has gone somewhat skewed due to injuries, but this year I am determined to make it work. And if I can make it work – so can you!

Yes, you…

and you…

and you too!

And yes, I am pointing to make it more dramatic!

So here is the deal:

Over the next few months and until the end of July I will be putting up rides to not only get us started but also to improve our fitness, discover great routes and maybe even get you to enter an event!? Perhaps you have already signed up for some awesome event like the SDW or looking to participate in this year’s Beachy Head Sportive?

Yes? – Start training!

No? – Sign up and start training!

Simples.

 

The kick-off will be on the Easter Monday (TOMORROW!) and then one or two rides a week. Keep an eye on the calendar and Facebook.

All rides will be off-road. I intend to start rides at a slower pace and shorter distance to break into this fitness malarkey slowly, and build up both the speed and mileage as we get fitter with each ride. We will cover our local SDW tracks and parts of the MTB sportive. I may even throw in a homing pigeon ride for extended fun. Watch this space!

I hope to see you on these rides whether you want to get fit or already are an awesome athlete. Riding a bike is great fun, but even more fun with friends, so let’s do it together J

“WHAT is sportive?” you might think…

It’s a posh way of saying that a group of cyclists get together for an organised ride. It’s a non-competitive event and you ride against yourself.

if you want to contact Ellie you can do so using the following here  

JUST IN CASE you are interested, the sportive supported by the local South East Mountain Biking is here:

https://www.britishcycling.org.uk/events/details/195400/Beachy-Head-MTB-Sportive-2019

Message from the Chair

I would like to thank everyone that attended the AGM last night. It was at times a little challenging but nevertheless very productive.

I’m grateful to those of you who voted to discuss the proposed changes to the constitution, despite a valid and legitimate challenge to defer it. The vote saved the committee a significant chunk of time and because of the number of attendees (75 in total),  it was perhaps more inclusive than doing it at a later date in an EGM.

For those of you that were disappointed by the decision to proceed with that item, I acknowledge that it was missing from the agenda. Sometimes things that are so obvious are overlooked because they are not given a second thought.

I probably made some other procedural errors but I don’t profess to be an expert in such things. Hopefully, my enthusiasm (and that of the committee) to progress things on behalf of the club compensates for this.

I also hope the majority of you felt that the subsequent proceedings were productive and gave individuals a chance to voice their opinions. As I said last night, the committee would welcome constructive criticism on any changes you think are necessary (this applies to anything the committee does, not just the constitution). There will be further opportunity to have your say.

We have taken on board the points raised and we will happily consider any further suggestions. Any additional constitutional changes will be made available to the membership in accordance with the EGM rules.

Finally, I would like to thank Denis Bass and his helpers for his culinary skills and all of you for attending and making the evening the success was.

I look forward to riding with you in the near future. 

Guy

Overworked, without pay, so a little help please!

Hi everyone.

This is Cycle Seahaven’s 10th year and membership is at a record high. We are not far off having 400 members but we can only achieve this if those of you that haven’t renewed do so now. There are about 70 of you that haven’t.

Denis Bass, the Membership Secretary and Treasurer, literally spends hours and hours of his free time chasing those that haven’t paid. So, PLEASE help to reduce his workload by making sure you have renewed your subscription for this year before the end of January. Annual membership is £8 for individuals, and £14 per household, reduced by £1 if you pay by standing order (CSH’s preferred option). It’s not a lot so little help sending your payment would GREATLY appreciated (and keep Denis looking young and fresh)!

If you’re not going to renew please let Denis know by emailing him using the following link and selecting ‘Membership’: https://cycleseahaven.org.uk/contact/ If you’re prepared to tell us why you’re leaving we would welcome the feedback.

If you are going to renew, or you can encourage a few friends to join, please use the following links.

The member who encourages the 400th member to join get a year’s free membership.

Payment methods are described below.

Membership page https://cycleseahaven.org.uk/membership/

Standing order form https://cycleseahaven.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Bankers-SO-Forms-2019.pdf

Individual membership form https://cycleseahaven.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/2019-Individual-Application-Form.pdf

Household membership form https://cycleseahaven.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/2019-HH-membership-application-form.pdf

Payment methods

Pay Pal Our online Shop

Cash      Pay cash at Mr Cycles Seaford

Cheque Payable to Cycle Seahaven and taken to Mr Cycles by Seaford railway station or by post to: Cycle Seahaven Treasurer, 12 Bowden Rise, Seaford, BN25 2HZ

Standing Order  Setting up a standing order ensures that your membership is renewed automatically each year – this saves us administration in chasing renewals. Just complete the appropriate Standing Order Form and post to the Treasurer at the address above.

BACS     By BACS transfer to:

Cycle Seahaven, Lloyds TSB

Sort Code 30-65-37

Account 22902360

There may be a delay in posting your membership card using BACS

Mobile payment (payM)

Send payment to 07788428082 with text or email to denis stating what the payment is for.

Thank you for your help and support.

Guy (Chair CSH)

Cycling UK Affiliate Membership

It has just come to my notice that by becoming an affiliate member of Cycling UK you do not get all the benefits of being a full member. I mention this in case anyone is deciding to become an affiliate member as a result of reading the article in the Cycle Seahaven newsletter about Cycling UK.

When the newsletter was published, we weren’t aware of this limitation; it’s not obvious on the Cycling UK website. However, when corresponding with Cycling UK on another matter it transpired that two of the benefits are not included with affiliate membership: the six issues of Cycle magazine a year and the free cycling related legal advice.

I have complained to Cycling UK and advised them that I feel their website is misleading on this matter.

Clive

Another Super Tourers’ Christmas Meal

Thirty-two of us, a record number, were at the Cycle Seahaven ‘Tourers’ Christmas meal in the British Legion yesterday evening. It was our fourth year in succession at the Legion so it’s become something of a tradition.

That’s hardly surprising as the meal is excellent value for money, the drink is competitively priced and it’s a very relaxed atmosphere in the Legion. No doubt we’ll be making a return visit next Christmas!

The touring rides will continue throughout this festive season, weather permitting, although not on Christmas Day or Boxing Day! The next planned ride will be on Sunday, 23rd December to Lakeside Café at Horam. After Christmas, the first touring ride will be on Friday, 28 December.

Merry Christmas everyone,

Clive

It is a Marmite Thing – SS UK 2018.

Riding without gears isn’t everyone’s cup of tea. Some do it for fitness, others for ease of maintenance and a few are just plain bonkers.

We are lucky to have a high number of Single Speed (SS) riders in Cycle Seahaven but let’s face it, we aren’t an average club. Even more impressive is the fact that all the club’s SS female riders are formidable in their own right and they never cease to impress.

Nationally, it was inevitable with the increasing popularity of SS that someone would hit upon the idea of a dedicated SS (MTB) event. In 2014 the concept became a reality and SS UK was born.

This year the event was hosted on the Isle of Wight. 120 people registered from all around the UK with a couple of foreign visitors thrown in. The Cycle Seahaven contingent consisted of Lexi, Ellie, Gus, Chris ‘Girder’ and I. All of us were SS UK ‘virgins’ and we weren’t really sure what to expect.

The ‘SS UK 2018’ signs that had been dotted around the Island signposted the event’s location and it left me wondering how many of the locals thought there was some kind of neo-Nazi gathering occurring on their doorstep. Fortunately, there were no protesters and by Friday afternoon the participants started to gather in anticipation of the first event which surprisingly involved a pub.

The ride started at 7:30 PM and was billed as a ‘moderate level’ 14-mile cross-country ride. The 3 ride leaders had been told to expect 10 to 15 riders but were faced with just over 60 instead. I’d love to see the faces of the CSH ride leaders if that ever happens on a CSH pub ride!

The SS ride started on a series of bridleways and quiet roads of the kind you might experience on a Cycle Seahaven pub ride, but that is where any similarity ended.

It soon became clear that this pub was situated somewhere in the outer hemisphere. Two seriously big climbs that would have made Itford and Windover feel inadequate stood between us and beer. In the SS world, there’s no shame in pushing up hills, unless other single speed riders ride it, in which case you can expect to be ridiculed. On this ride, no one was going to be ridiculed as these hills would have been challenging on a pimped up E-bike on steroids.

Having made it up the last hill the riders were rewarded with spectacular nocturnal views of the island,  shipping lanes and the lights of Portsmouth reflecting in the Solent. The temptation to stand and stare was tapered by the realisation that 60 riders make for a very long queue at the bar. Well played Mr ‘Girder’, beer AND chips for his teamies!

Fast forward an hour and the ride leaders had managed to reassemble everyone on the top of the cliffs ready for the ride down to the nearest town (Sandown). The ensuing descent could have caused a Health and Safety Officer to melt down. After all, what could go wrong with 60 beer-fuelled riders descending cliff paths in the darkness? What you can’t see, can’t hurt you; right? I am not sure why, but I thought of Lemmings midway down.

Surprisingly, we all survived (maybe I was just being a wimp in the darkness) and we rode along the long sandy beach to join the promenade (and a few bemused Policemen), before a more conventional return to base. Ever concerned about the risks of dehydration our thoughtful organisers ensured there were multiple kegs of local beer at £2.50 a pint. Great value, even with the IOW exchange rate. Over a beer, I asked my CSH companions what grading they would have given the ride. ‘Z 10’ was the reply; enough said!

The following morning an even larger group set out on a 16-mile route that took us along one of the many disused railway tracks built by the Victorians, who were forward thinking enough to consider their potential use for future single speed events. Many of the riders had chosen to wear fancy dress just to make the ride a little more challenging (and for those wearing thongs, just a tad disturbing). Several miles later and just over a 100 SS riders moved over to the edge of the track to let a couple of horse riders go by. They were clearly impressed but after their 65th ‘Thank you’ their voices were getting a little hoarse (geddit?….Sorry).

Next came the anticipated, inevitable, hill climb for beer; the SS rider’s equivalent of a Donkey’s carrot. Whilst not as severe as the night before this was another one of those ‘get off and walk’ type hills that the organisers seemed to enjoy….sadists! However, good to their word, several kegs of beer had been positioned at the summit and pints of beer and children’s windmills, were given to each rider. These, we were told, would differentiate the ‘hard-core’ riders from those that had elected to do the shorter ride, ‘Shirkers’ ride; who we were destined to meet further along the route.

The descent this time was more reminiscent of those we regularly experience on the South Downs Way and, with the addition of daylight, there were less ‘pucker’ moments than the night before.

Having joined up with the ‘shirkers’ group we all rode as one, along Sandown’s promenade towards the beach. This was to serve as the arena and racetrack for the main event. We were greeted by a local musician singing well know reggae songs in the afternoon sun, a nice touch, as we prepared for the race that would decide the SS UK 2018 champions.

This year’s course involved tearing down the beach for a quarter of a mile, rounding an oil drum and tearing back up the beach, through a chicane, towards the start line. Sounds simple right, but we were soon to discover this was the bike version of wading through treacle.

You will have surmised by now that anything related to SS UK wasn’t to be taken too seriously. The Championship was no exception.  Our bikes were left on the beach and we were walked to the far side of a playing field immediately above, but just out of view, of the beach. This was going to be a Le Mans style start and when the horn sounded we ran, walked and stumbled for our steeds before commencing the downwind, seaward side of the course. Skidding, crashing and in some cases remaining upright, the riders rounded the oil drum at the far end of the beach before the slog into the wind along with some soft, deep sand. This was energy sapping stuff and the brief was to keep going until you quit or were told to stop. Several laps later and the organisers called a halt. Those that hadn’t reached the finish line were disqualified, those that had progressed to the next round. After a brief pit stop of beer and jellybeans, the remaining survivors went again. This process repeated itself until only 10 were left. We had our finalists.

The male finalists were marched back to the field for yet another Le Mans style start; this time with a twist.

Whilst out of view their bikes were placed on a raft which was positioned about 20 feet offshore. Their faces as they ran into the waist-deep water to collect their bikes was highly amusing, at least for the spectators, after which the competitors commenced another two energy-sapping laps. Finally, we had a winner!

Next up was the ladies race. The six finalists (CSH SS ladies we need more of you there next year) had a more conventional start to the race. Amongst this group of athletes was our very own Ellie. Now, call me biased, but after Ellie’s serious ‘break everything I can’ crash two months ago I was amazed and impressed that she had done all of the aforementioned rides. So to see her on the start line champing at the bit filled me with a sense of pride; there’s no doubt she applies rule 5! Ellie took off like a whippet and her racing line, unlike the others, involved ploughing through a small section of the English Channel. The resulting plume of spray was visible from the far end of the beach. By the end of the race she had finished fourth; exhausted, sandy and wet. I had noted that the ‘winner’ wasn’t wearing a windmill and she was, therefore, a lot fresher than the other competitors but, as you’ve probably gathered by now, we weren’t taking this too seriously. However, for the record, I think this year’s female SS UK winner was a Scandinavian lass dressed as Goldilocks.

That evening the event concluded with Fish and Chips, a live rock band, more ridiculously cheap beer, a raffle and prize-giving. To my delight Ellie had been voted by the event organisers as the most deserving female rider of the weekend, a decision cemented by her epic water splash. As a prize she was presented with a brand-new Surly Cyclo Cross frame and for once, she was speechless. How many of you can say you’ve ever witnessed that? Well done Ellie, as rehabilitation rides go you smashed this weekend.

This was a brilliant, relaxed and fun weekend with so many Single Speed bikes to admire I nearly dehydrated through drooling. If you’ve ever fancied having a go on a single speed please get in touch, I’d be happy to arrange something for you. You’ll either love it or hate it. It’s a Marmite thing!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Strava – Are you protected?

Strava is a great tool, most of the riders I know in the club use it. However, it can be used for more sinister reasons. If you don’t apply some simple precautions anyone can view your profile. It will show them where you live, any pattern of activity and if you’ve described your bike, what type of bikes you own.

I’m told  a gang of professional bike thieves were arrested in the North of England after they researched ‘unprotected’ Strava accounts to target houses were high value bikes were kept. It crossed my mind that many people probably don’t know about the importance of  Strava privacy settings. So here, courtesy of Strava Support, is the information you may want to consider to make things just a little more secure:

Creating a Privacy Zone

On the website, go to your Settings page by hovering over your profile picture in the top right and selecting “Settings”.

Click on the Privacy tab on the left side of the page.

Enter a location in the text field provided under “Hide your house/office on your activity maps”, select the size of the privacy radius, and click “Create Privacy Zone.”

https://support.strava.com/hc/en-us/articles/115000173384-Privacy-Zones

How it Works

The portion of your activity that starts or stops within your privacy zone will be hidden from other Strava athletes who view your activity. You will be able to see data inside your privacy zone, but other athletes will not.

  • If you stop in a privacy zone during the middle of an activity, this portion will not be hidden.
  • Your privacy zone will be automatically applied to all past and future activities.
  • GPS location-based lat/long coordinates can be used in place of a street address for cases where there is no street address.
  • Only one privacy zone can be applied to the start or end point for each activity. So if you have multiple, overlapping privacy zones, only one will be applied to each start or end point.
  • If a friend starts their activity from within your privacy zone, the portion that began in your zone will not be hidden on their activity.
  • You will not appear on any segment leaderboard that starts/stops within your Privacy Zone and you cannot hold or earn any KOMs/CRs on those segments. Removing a Privacy Zone will reinstate your segment matches and any associated KOMs/CRs.
  • Your Privacy Zone will be respected when you share on Facebook.

Manage Followers & Block Athletes

From your profile page, you can easily manage your current followers from the “Following” tab. When you block an athlete, it stops him/her from following you again, seeing certain Profile details, or accessing your activities. You will be removed from his/her list of followers and Activity Feed. Someone you’ve blocked will be able to see your activity entries in public areas like segment leaderboards, club feeds, and segment explore.

https://support.strava.com/hc/en-us/articles/115000173484

SOUTH DOWNS NATIONAL PARK AMBASSADORS

The next time you’re on a club ride have a look around and see if you can spot anyone staring at a plant, discussing historic sites, marvelling at geology or chasing butterflies. It’s just possible you’ve found a South Downs National Park Ambassador.

These strange creatures are found all along the South Downs Way and their role is to promote the delights of the National Park. On ‘our’ section of the South Downs there are 11 Ambassadors and a couple more over in Eastbourne. Their role is really simple. They chat, they smile and they enthuse about the wonderful countryside and its wildlife inhabitants. Ambassadors seek to encourage walkers, horse and bike riders to have fun in a responsible, environmentally friendly manner. Our ambassadors might have a little bias towards cycling, but can you blame them? The South Downs has something for every kind of cyclist to enjoy. As well as the famous South Downs Way to explore there are 1,200 km of car-free bridleways across the National Park, miles of leafy country lanes and old railway trails including the Downs Link and Centurions Way.

And, did you know, that the 160km long South Downs Way is the only UK’s National Trail which is fully traversable by bike? There are many ways to enjoy it. You could ride along the ridge to reach Ditchling Beacon and enjoy the view or cycle along the Hampshire Hangers and single track mountain bike trails at Queen Elizabeth Country Park.

With so many tracks, trails and leafy lanes to discover and great places to stop for locally produced food and drink there’s never been a better time to discover the South Downs by bike. Oh, and if you spot a South Downs Ambassador be sure to offer a smile and say ‘Hi’.